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Prof. R. Murray presents Operational Test and Evaluation for Safety-Critical Autonomous Systems: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities

Seminarium

From: 2022-09-23 10:30 to 11:30
Place: Seminar Room KC 3N27 and Zoom
Contact: anders [dot] rantzer [at] control [dot] lth [dot] se
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The Department of Automatic Control is happy to host a guest seminar by professor Richard Murray from Caltech, USA.

Where: Seminar room KC 3N27 and Zoom https://lu-se.zoom.us/j/3246833728 
When: Friday 23rd of September 10:30-11:30
Author: Richard Murray, Caltech USA
Title: Operational Test and Evaluation for Safety-Critical Autonomous Systems: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities


Abstract:

Safety certification of autonomous vehicles is a major challenge due to the complexity of the environments in which they are intended to operate.  In this talk I will discuss recent work in establishing the mathematical and algorithmic foundations of test and evaluation by combining advances in formal methods for specification and verification of reactive, distributed systems with algorithmic design of multi-agent test scenarios, and algorithmic evaluation of test results. Building on previous results in synthesis of formal contracts for performance of agents and subsystems, we are creating a mathematical framework for specifying the desired characteristics of multi-agent systems involving cooperative, adversarial, and adaptive interactions, develop algorithms for verification and validation (V&V) as well as test and evaluation (T&E) of the specifications, and perform proof-of-concept implementations that demonstrate the use of formal methods for V&V and T&E of autonomous systems. These results provide more systematic methods for describing the desired properties of autonomous systems in complex environments and new algorithms for verification of system-level designs against those properties, synthesis of test plans, and analysis of test results.

Bio:

Richard M. Murray received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from California Institute of Technology in 1985 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1988 and 1991, respectively. He is currently the Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control & Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering at Caltech. Murray's research is in the application of feedback and control to networked systems, with applications in biology and autonomy. Current projects include analysis and design of biomolecular feedback circuits, synthesis of discrete decision-making protocols for reactive systems, and design of highly resilient architectures for autonomous systems.